Planting Malunggay

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The Malunggay tree is a fixture found in just about every Philippine yard.  The nutritious leaves are used in soups and other dishes. I especially like them in monggo soup, so of course we wanted our own supply of Malunggay.  One kindly lady at a plant nursery gave me a tiny little Malunggay plant.  My wife and everyone else laughed when I planted it on our lot.  Our neighbors in Tigbauan said they’d bring us a Malunggay tree.  It’s all pretty simple once you know how it’s done.

Newly planted Malunggay tree

Newly planted Malunggay tree

Planting Malunggay is accomplished by hacking off a branch of sprout of an existing Malunggay tree and sticking it in the ground.  I came back to look the next day and here’s what I found:

Malunggay sprouts leaves in one day!

Malunggay sprouts leaves in one day!

It looks like we may be harvesting Malunggay leaves in a few weeks or months.  Malunggay is thought to be very nutritious and it’s cultivation and consumption in promoted by the Philippine government.  It seems to have been a native of India.  Lots more information at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malunggay

Also note the kangkong (water spinach) spreading on the ground below the Malunggay.  This edible plant is also widely eaten in the Philippines and has virtually taken over our lot without any effort on our part.  I especially like it in the sour soup sinigang.  For more information see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ipomoea_aquatica

Comments (4) Write a comment

  1. Bob, Glad you posted this! I am in a group in the USA that is trying to grow Malunggay in green houses. In the USA they call it Moringa. Any way they are trying to start from seed and having lots of issues.
    Thanks Stanley

    Reply

  2. thank you for the post and ton of info, it is well appreciated.
    very informative and entertaining

    Reply

  3. how about that malunggay tree–pretty hardy, huh?? or you just have the greenest thumb ever..

    Reply

  4. Hi BOB
    Like everybody else we also have a malunggay tree in our backyard. I love eating malunggay and its health benefits even makes me want more.
    The simplest recipe for malunggay I know and grew up with is the one having balingon (dilis) and beaten egg.

    Reply

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