Cassava – from digging the root to delicious dessert – Cassava Suman

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We grow Cassava in our Philippine garden, dig the Cassava roots and make a delicious Philippine dessert, Cassava Suman. Cassava is an important food crop in much of the world’s tropics. On the plus side, Cassava is easy to grow, even in poor soils, produces a big yield. Most of the plant is edible, even delicious, when properly and safely prepared. Cassava is a very low protein food and is inadequate as a sustained diet. Safety is a concern because Cassava contains cyanide which can and must be removed during preparation. Please don’t rely on this short article to guide you in the safe preparation of Cassava.

Cassava plants in our Philippine garden

Cassava plants in our Philippine garden.  The plants may not be big but the tubers are surprisingly large

Cassava leaves are both beautiful and edible

Cassava leaves are both beautiful and edible

Digging Cassava roots

Digging Cassava roots

Cassava roots

Cassava roots

The roots are peeled and grated

The roots are peeled and grated

 

Grated cassava roots are soaked and then squeezed to remove liquid and toxins

Grated cassava roots are soaked and then squeezed to remove liquid and toxins

 

Grated coconut and sugar are blended with the cassava

Grated young coconut, butter, sugar, salt and vanilla are blended with the processed cassava

The mixture is wrapped in banana leaves

The mixture is wrapped in banana leaves

The banana wrapped mixture becomes a cassava suman - a dessert

The banana wrapped mixture is steamed and becomes a cassava suman – a delicious dessert

Cassava Suman - ready to eat

Cassava Suman – ready to eat

Comments (2) Write a comment

    • Hi Tara,

      I asked Carol and she says about one year to get big tubers like those shown.

      Reply

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